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Isometric Contractions Are More Analgesic Than Isotonic Contractions for Patellar Tendon Pain

Overview of attention for article published in Clinical Journal of Sport Medicine, May 2017
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About this Attention Score

  • In the top 5% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • One of the highest-scoring outputs from this source (#4 of 1,407)
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (99th percentile)
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (94th percentile)

Mentioned by

blogs
2 blogs
twitter
329 tweeters
facebook
29 Facebook pages
googleplus
1 Google+ user

Citations

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25 Dimensions

Readers on

mendeley
196 Mendeley
Title
Isometric Contractions Are More Analgesic Than Isotonic Contractions for Patellar Tendon Pain
Published in
Clinical Journal of Sport Medicine, May 2017
DOI 10.1097/jsm.0000000000000364
Pubmed ID
Authors

Ebonie Rio, Mathijs van Ark, Sean Docking, G. Lorimer Moseley, Dawson Kidgell, Jamie E. Gaida, Inge van den Akker-Scheek, Johannes Zwerver, Jill Cook

Abstract

This study aimed to compare the immediate analgesic effects of 2 resistance programs in in-season athletes with patellar tendinopathy (PT). Resistance training is noninvasive, a principle stimulus for corticospinal and neuromuscular adaptation, and may be analgesic. Within-season randomized clinical trial. Data analysis was conducted blinded to group. Subelite volleyball and basketball competitions. Twenty jumping athletes aged more than 16 years, participating in games/trainings 3 times per week with clinically diagnosed PT. Two quadriceps resistance protocols were compared; (1) isometric leg extension holds at 60 degrees knee flexion (80% of their maximal voluntary isometric contraction) or (2) isotonic leg extension (at 80% of their 8 repetition maximum) 4 times per week for 4 weeks. Time under load and rest between sets was matched between groups. (1) Pain (0-10 numerical rating score) during single leg decline squat (SLDS), measured preintervention and postintervention sessions. (2) VISA-P, a questionnaire about tendon pain and function, completed at baseline and after 4 weeks. Twenty athletes with PT (18 men, mean 22.5 ± 4.7 years) participated (isotonic n = 10, isometric n = 10). Baseline median SLDS pain was 5/10 for both groups (isotonic range 1-8, isometric range 2-8). Isometric contractions produced significantly greater immediate analgesia (P < 0.002). Week one analgesic response positively correlated with improvements in VISA-P at 4 weeks (r = 0.64). Both protocols appear efficacious for in-season athletes to reduce pain, however, isometric contractions demonstrated significantly greater immediate analgesia throughout the 4-week trial. Greater analgesia may increase the ability to load or perform.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 329 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 196 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Italy 2 1%
Unknown 194 99%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Master 20 10%
Other 17 9%
Student > Bachelor 17 9%
Unspecified 15 8%
Student > Postgraduate 15 8%
Other 44 22%
Unknown 68 35%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Medicine and Dentistry 42 21%
Nursing and Health Professions 31 16%
Sports and Recreations 25 13%
Unspecified 21 11%
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 4 2%
Other 5 3%
Unknown 68 35%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 233. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 01 June 2019.
All research outputs
#52,284
of 13,238,738 outputs
Outputs from Clinical Journal of Sport Medicine
#4
of 1,407 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#2,285
of 263,574 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Clinical Journal of Sport Medicine
#2
of 38 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 13,238,738 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done particularly well and is in the 99th percentile: it's in the top 5% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 1,407 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a lot more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 12.6. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 99% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 263,574 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 99% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 38 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 94% of its contemporaries.