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Influence of Gender on the Performance of Cardiopulmonary Rescue Teams

Overview of attention for article published in Critical Care Medicine, July 2017
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About this Attention Score

  • In the top 5% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • Among the highest-scoring outputs from this source (#31 of 7,529)
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (98th percentile)
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (97th percentile)

Mentioned by

news
15 news outlets
twitter
69 tweeters
facebook
4 Facebook pages

Citations

dimensions_citation
23 Dimensions

Readers on

mendeley
53 Mendeley
Title
Influence of Gender on the Performance of Cardiopulmonary Rescue Teams
Published in
Critical Care Medicine, July 2017
DOI 10.1097/ccm.0000000000002375
Pubmed ID
Authors

Simon Adrian Amacher, Cleo Schumacher, Corinne Legeret, Franziska Tschan, Norbert Karl Semmer, Stephan Marsch, Sabina Hunziker

Abstract

Little is known about the influence of gender on resuscitation performance which may improve future education in resuscitation. The aim of this study was to compare female and male rescuers in regard to cardiopulmonary resuscitation and leadership performance. Prospective, randomized simulator study. High-fidelity patient simulator center of the medical ICU, University Hospitals Basel (Switzerland). Two hundred sixteen volunteer medical students (108 females and 108 males) of two Swiss universities in teams of three. None. We analyzed data on the group and the individual level separately. The primary outcome on the group level was the hands-on time within the first 180 seconds after the onset of the cardiac arrest. Compared with male-only teams, female-only teams showed less hands-on time (mean ± SD) (87 ± 41 vs 109 ± 33 s; p = 0.037) and a longer delay before the start of chest compressions (109 ± 77 vs 70 ± 56 s; p = 0.038). Additionally, female-only teams showed a lower leadership performance in different domains and fewer unsolicited cardiopulmonary resuscitation measures compared with male-only teams. On the individual level, which was assessed in mixed teams only, female gender was associated with a lower number of secure leadership statements (3 ± 2 vs 5 ± 3; p = 0.027). Results were confirmed in regression analysis adjusted for team composition. We found important gender differences, with female rescuers showing inferior cardiopulmonary resuscitation performance, which can partially be explained by fewer unsolicited cardiopulmonary resuscitation measures and inferior female leadership. Future education of rescuers should take gender differences into account.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 69 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 53 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 53 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Bachelor 7 13%
Unspecified 6 11%
Student > Master 6 11%
Researcher 4 8%
Other 4 8%
Other 12 23%
Unknown 14 26%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Medicine and Dentistry 14 26%
Nursing and Health Professions 11 21%
Unspecified 6 11%
Psychology 3 6%
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 2 4%
Other 0 0%
Unknown 17 32%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 165. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 19 May 2020.
All research outputs
#105,856
of 15,099,899 outputs
Outputs from Critical Care Medicine
#31
of 7,529 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#4,022
of 265,204 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Critical Care Medicine
#3
of 129 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 15,099,899 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done particularly well and is in the 99th percentile: it's in the top 5% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 7,529 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a lot more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 10.0. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 99% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 265,204 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 98% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 129 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 97% of its contemporaries.