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Accuracy of self-monitored blood pressure for diagnosing hypertension in primary care

Overview of attention for article published in Journal of Hypertension, April 2015
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About this Attention Score

  • In the top 25% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • Good Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (76th percentile)
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (90th percentile)

Mentioned by

policy
1 policy source
twitter
5 tweeters

Citations

dimensions_citation
24 Dimensions

Readers on

mendeley
44 Mendeley
citeulike
1 CiteULike
Title
Accuracy of self-monitored blood pressure for diagnosing hypertension in primary care
Published in
Journal of Hypertension, April 2015
DOI 10.1097/hjh.0000000000000489
Pubmed ID
Authors

David Nunan, Matthew Thompson, Carl J. Heneghan, Rafael Perera, Richard J. McManus, Alison Ward

Abstract

To assess the diagnostic accuracy of recommendations for self-monitoring blood pressure (BP) for diagnosing hypertension in primary care. Two hundred and forty-seven consecutive participants with raised (≥130 mmHg systolic) BP measured by their general practitioner from four primary care practices in the United Kingdom underwent 28 days of self-monitoring followed by 24-h ambulatory BP monitoring (ABPM). Diagnostic accuracy of the first 7 days of self-monitored BP (minimum 4 days, discarding readings on day 1) in detecting hypertension with ambulatory blood pressure was taken as reference. Two hundred and three participants were included, 109 (53.7%) of whom were diagnosed with hypertension using daytime ambulatory BP. The average of days 2-7 self-monitored BP correctly classified 150 of 203 participants [sensitivity 93.6%, 95% confidence interval (CI) 87.2-97.4%; specificity 51.1%, 95% CI 40.5-61.5%). However, the average of days 2-5 self-monitoring correctly classified 152 of 203 participants due to better specificity (53.2%, 95% CI 42.6-63.6%). In sensitivity analysis, diagnostic accuracy was not improved by inclusion of readings beyond day 5, and inclusion of readings taken on day 1 had no impact on diagnostic accuracy. Self-monitoring in the clinic was more accurate than readings taken by the general practitioner, but not self-monitoring outside of the clinic. Hypertension can be ruled out in the majority of patients with elevated clinic BP using the average of the first 5 consecutive days of self-monitored BP, supporting lower limits for self-monitoring readings in current guidelines. Performing readings beyond day 5 and including readings taken on the first day had no clinical impact on diagnostic accuracy.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 5 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 44 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 44 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Master 8 18%
Student > Ph. D. Student 8 18%
Researcher 6 14%
Professor 4 9%
Student > Doctoral Student 2 5%
Other 9 20%
Unknown 7 16%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Medicine and Dentistry 18 41%
Nursing and Health Professions 9 20%
Social Sciences 2 5%
Earth and Planetary Sciences 1 2%
Immunology and Microbiology 1 2%
Other 2 5%
Unknown 11 25%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 6. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 15 August 2019.
All research outputs
#3,486,216
of 17,356,510 outputs
Outputs from Journal of Hypertension
#462
of 4,289 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#51,660
of 230,964 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Journal of Hypertension
#8
of 82 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 17,356,510 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done well and is in the 76th percentile: it's in the top 25% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 4,289 research outputs from this source. They receive a mean Attention Score of 4.1. This one has done well, scoring higher than 86% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 230,964 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done well, scoring higher than 76% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 82 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 90% of its contemporaries.