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Short-Term Heat Acclimation and Precooling, Independently and Combined, Improve 5-km Time Trial Performance in the Heat

Overview of attention for article published in Journal of Strength & Conditioning Research, May 2018
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About this Attention Score

  • In the top 5% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (98th percentile)
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (98th percentile)

Mentioned by

news
11 news outlets
blogs
2 blogs
twitter
48 tweeters
facebook
1 Facebook page

Citations

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14 Dimensions

Readers on

mendeley
72 Mendeley
Title
Short-Term Heat Acclimation and Precooling, Independently and Combined, Improve 5-km Time Trial Performance in the Heat
Published in
Journal of Strength & Conditioning Research, May 2018
DOI 10.1519/jsc.0000000000001979
Pubmed ID
Authors

Carl A. James, Alan J. Richardson, Peter W. Watt, Ashley G.B. Willmott, Oliver R. Gibson, Neil S. Maxwell

Abstract

Following heat acclimation (HA), endurance running performance remains impaired in hot vs temperate conditions. Combining HA with precooling demonstrates no additive benefit in intermittent sprint, or continuous cycling exercise protocols, during which heat strain may be less severe compared to endurance running. This study investigated the effect of short-term heat acclimation (STHA) combined with mixed-methods precooling, on endurance running performance and directly compared precooling and HA. Nine amateur trained runners completed 5 km treadmill time trials in the heat (32°C, 60% RH) under four conditions; no intervention (CON), precooling (PC), short-term heat acclimation (5 days - HA) and short-term heat acclimation with precooling (HA+PC). Mean (±SD) performance times were; CON 1476 (173) s, PC 1421 (146) s, HA 1378 (116) s and HA+PC 1373 (121) s. This equated to the following improvements versus CON; PC -3.7%, HA -6.6% and HA+PC -7.0%. Statistical differences were only observed between HA and CON (p=0.004, d=0.68, 95% CI [-0.27, 1.63]) however, similar effect sizes were observed for HA+PC vs CON (d=0.70, 95% CI [-0.25, 1.65]), with smaller effects between PC vs CON (d=0.34, 95% CI [-0.59, 1.27]), HA vs PC (d=0.33, 95% CI [-0.60, 1.26]) and HA+PC vs PC (d=0.36, 95% CI [-0.57, 1.29]). Pilot testing revealed a time trial typical error of 16 s (1.2%). Precooling offered no further benefit to performance in the acclimated individual, despite modest alleviation of physiological strain. Maintenance of running speed in HA+PC, despite reduced physiological strain, may indicate an inappropriate pacing strategy therefore, further familiarisation is recommended to optimise a combined strategy. Finally, these data indicate HA, achieved through cycle training, yields a larger ergogenic effect than precooling on 5km running performance in the heat, although precooling remains beneficial when HA is not possible.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 48 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 72 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 72 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Master 13 18%
Student > Bachelor 10 14%
Student > Ph. D. Student 9 13%
Researcher 8 11%
Lecturer 3 4%
Other 11 15%
Unknown 18 25%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Sports and Recreations 31 43%
Nursing and Health Professions 6 8%
Medicine and Dentistry 3 4%
Social Sciences 2 3%
Engineering 2 3%
Other 6 8%
Unknown 22 31%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 138. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 18 August 2020.
All research outputs
#193,401
of 19,287,605 outputs
Outputs from Journal of Strength & Conditioning Research
#111
of 6,071 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#5,338
of 278,680 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Journal of Strength & Conditioning Research
#3
of 101 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 19,287,605 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done particularly well and is in the 98th percentile: it's in the top 5% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 6,071 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a lot more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 17.2. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 98% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 278,680 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 98% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 101 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 98% of its contemporaries.